Technology » Science

1 thru 15 of 1829 Stories
Tracking Bobcats: Researchers Need Help Finding GPS Collars

Tracking Bobcats: Researchers Need Help Finding GPS Collars

By Dave Collins | Jul 18
In a couple of weeks, collars on cats across the state will be falling off. But it's not some prank or devious experiment - it's one of the largest studies of its kind on bobcats.

Archaeologists in Egypt Discover Mummification Workshop

Archaeologists in Egypt Discover Mummification Workshop

By Menna Zaki | Jul 17
Archaeologists in Egypt stumbled upon a new discovery dating back to more than 2,500 years ago near Egypt's famed pyramids at an ancient necropolis south of Cairo.

FDA OKs 1st Drug to Treat Smallpox, in Case of Terror Attack

FDA OKs 1st Drug to Treat Smallpox, in Case of Terror Attack

By Linda A. Johnson | Jul 17
U.S. regulators Friday approved the first treatment for smallpox - a deadly disease that was wiped out four decades ago - in case the virus is used in a terror attack.

TravelLab: Adults Take Over Science Museums When Night Falls

TravelLab: Adults Take Over Science Museums When Night Falls

By Emiliano Rodriguez Mega | Jul 16
On a recent June evening, 175 grown-ups signed up for a slumber party at the New York museum, which has capitalized on the hype created by Ben Stiller's "Night at the Museum" franchise.

Archaeologists in Egypt Discover Mummification Workshop

Archaeologists in Egypt Discover Mummification Workshop

By Menna Zaki | Jul 16
Archaeologists in Egypt stumbled upon a new discovery dating back to more than 2,500 years ago near Egypt's famed pyramids at an ancient necropolis south of Cairo.

Ancient 'Iceman' Shows Signs of A Well-Balanced Last Meal

Ancient 'Iceman' Shows Signs of A Well-Balanced Last Meal

By Emiliano Rodriguez Mega | Jul 15
Talk about a paleo diet. Scientists have uncovered the last meal of a frozen hunter who died 5,300 years ago in the Alps.

FDA to More Aggressively Tackle Disruptive Drug Shortages

FDA to More Aggressively Tackle Disruptive Drug Shortages

By Linda A. Johnson | Jul 15
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration said Thursday it wants to more aggressively fight medication shortages that have led to rationing of some drugs and disrupted patient care.

Africa's Iconic Baobab Trees Dying Off at Alarming Rate

Africa's Iconic Baobab Trees Dying Off at Alarming Rate

By Kevin Sutherland | Jul 15
Africa's ancient baobab, with its distinctive swollen trunk and known as the "tree of life," is under a new and mysterious threat, with some of the largest and oldest dying abruptly in recent years.

Louisiana's Whooping Cranes Make Small Comeback

Louisiana's Whooping Cranes Make Small Comeback

Jul 14
Endangered whooping cranes released into Louisiana's wilds have had their best hatching season so far, with five chicks foraging in crawfish ponds. They are part of generations of work to bring back the birds, which barely escaped extinction.

 Report: NASA Needs Backup Plan as U.S. Crew Launches Slip

Report: NASA Needs Backup Plan as U.S. Crew Launches Slip

By Marcia Dunn | Jul 14
NASA needs a backup plan for getting astronauts to space, given additional delays on the horizon for new commercial crew capsules, the U.S. Government Accountability Office recommended Wednesday.

Late-Life High Blood Pressure May Harm the Brain, Study Says

Late-Life High Blood Pressure May Harm the Brain, Study Says

By Marilynn Marchione | Jul 14
A new study reveals that high blood pressure late in life might harm the brain.

Iceberg 4 Miles Wide Breaks Off from Greenland Glacier

Iceberg 4 Miles Wide Breaks Off from Greenland Glacier

Jul 14
An iceberg four miles (six kilometers) wide has broken off from a glacier in eastern Greenland and scientists have captured the dramatic event on video.

Chinese Find Suggests Human Relatives Left Africa Earlier

Chinese Find Suggests Human Relatives Left Africa Earlier

By Emiliano Rodriguez Mega | Jul 13
Stone tools recovered from an excavation in China suggest that our evolutionary forerunners trekked out of Africa earlier than we thought.

Pollution Controls Help Red Spruce Rebound from Acid Rain

Pollution Controls Help Red Spruce Rebound from Acid Rain

By Lisa Rathke | Jul 12
The gray trunks of red spruce trees killed by acid rain once heavily scarred the mountain forests of the Northeast. Now those forests are mostly green, thanks to a reduction in the kind of air pollution that triggers acid rain.

 Study Provides Clues to Fate of Early North American Dogs

Study Provides Clues to Fate of Early North American Dogs

By Emiliano Rodriguez Mega | Jul 11
A new study provides fresh evidence that the first dogs of North America all but disappeared after the arrival of Europeans.

1 thru 15 of 1829 Stories